Spring Gardening: Beautiful Flowers to Grow This Year

 

You know what they say…April showers bring May flowers. And at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction, we think there’s nothing better than taking a stroll through a garden full of fresh, beautiful, fragrant flowers.

Aside from adding beauty, planting a flower garden at your house has a lot of benefits.

First, gardening is great exercise!

Digging holes, planting, watering, and weeding your garden are all activities that require you to get up and moving. And, as an added bonus, caring for your garden gets you outside and into the fresh air.

Second, gardening is always a great hobby and social activity. Across the country, there are numerous gardening clubs and societies you can join if flowers are your passion. Attending garden society meetings and flower shows is a great way to make friends and learn new things.

And last, but certainly not least, planting a flower garden helps the bees. While you may not care for these flying critters, they are extremely important for pollination. Without their help, many of the foods we love would not be able to grow.

Whatever your reason for wanting to garden, the best part is that as long as you have access to flower seeds, gardening tools, a patch of soil, and live in a climate zone that’s suitable, you can easily grow your very own garden—no green thumb needed!

Ready to start your own garden this spring? Let’s take a look at the different climate zones so you can determine what flowers grow best in your area.

Zones 3 and 4 – Carnations, Hyacinths, and Black-Eyed Susans

In the United States, zones 3 and 4 sit in the large area of land between the Rocky Mountains and the Great Lakes north of Nebraska.

This region has cold winters and short summers, yet despite the cool temperatures, a few flower varieties thrive in these areas.

If you live in zonez 3 or 4, try your hand at planting carnations, hyacinths, and black-eyed Susans.

Zones 5 and 6 – Marigolds, Roses, and Hydrangeas

Zones 5 and 6 are located in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Illinois, and Ohio. These states tend to have dry summers, which means drought-tolerant flowers are key for this area.

Flowers like marigolds, roses, and hydrangeas will do best here. If you want to plant non-drought-tolerant flowers, be sure to water them often during the hot summer months.

Zones 7 and 8 – Hibiscus, Freckled Geisha Japanese Iris, and the Climbing Tea Rose

Texas, California, the Carolinas, and the southern half of Oregon are classified as zones 7 and 8. These zones are known for mild winters and warm, dry summers.

The cool thing about this zone is that flowers can be grown year-round due to temperate climates.

Beautiful flowers like the hibiscus, Freckled Geisha Japanese iris, and the climbing tea rose do well in this environment.  If you live in zones 7 or 8, give those flower varieties a try!

If you’re a South Carolina native, you might know that South Carolina’s state flower is the Gelsemium sempervirens—a vibrant yellow, trumpet-shaped blossom.

These flowers grow very well in the Charleston area. If you’re local to the area, try planting this flower variety in your garden this year!

Zones 9 and 10 – Fanfare Gaillardia, Summer Breeze Agastache, and the Casablanca Lily

Zones 9 and 10 include California, Florida, and Hawaii.

These regions are known for stable, hot temperatures throughout the year. In the winter months, these zones experience high humidity and rain.

Because of the heat and humidity, flowers like the Fanfare Gaillardia, Summer Breeze Agastache, and the Casablanca lily grow best in this zone.

Best of luck in your new spring flower garden!

Do you have a favorite spring flower you plant every year?

Share that with us in the comments below!

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