3 Delicious Fall-Inspired Apple Recipes

It’s that time of year…apple season!

There’s truly nothing better taking a trip to the apple orchard (or grocery store if you don’t have an orchard near you), handpicking a variety of apples, and then taking them home to cook up a delicious recipe.

Even better, apples are filled with antioxidants and plenty of dietary fiber, so you don’t have to feel guilty when cooking with this sweet, crisp fruit.

Cooking with apples is one of our favorite things about the fall season. And for that reason, we thought it would be fun to share some of our favorite recipes with you.

Check them out below…

Roasted Pork Tenderloin with Apples Recipe

When you think of cooking with apples, chances are you think about dessert—apple pies, cakes, etc. But apples also pair extremely well with savory foods, especially pork. Give this roasted pork tenderloin with apples recipe a try!

Ingredients:

  • 2 pork tenderloins (about 1 1/2-pounds each)
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more as needed
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, plus more as needed
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 apples, cored and sliced (we like Granny Smith, Golden Delicious or Braeburn)
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 1 cup chicken stock, see our homemade chicken stock recipe
  • 1 tablespoon butter

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Trim each tenderloin of any silver skin (this can be tough when cooked, just use a small sharp knife and slide the blade under and outward to remove it).
  3. Pat pork dry with paper towels and then rub with 1 tablespoon of the oil and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt.
  4. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a heavy-bottomed oven-safe skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmers, add the pork tenderloins and cook, turning occasionally, until evenly browned all over; about 12 minutes. Transfer to a large plate or cutting board. (The pork will not be cooked through).
  5. Keep the pan used to sear the pork on the stove over medium heat. Check the pan, if it looks dry, add 2 to 3 teaspoons of additional oil. (If there is fat left in the pan from cooking the pork, there is no need to add additional oil.)
  6. Add the apples and onions and then cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned around edges, about 5 minutes. Stir in 1 teaspoon of thyme.
  7. Use a pastry brush (or use your fingers) to rub the seared pork all over with the mustard, 2 teaspoons of thyme, and the black pepper.
  8. Place the seared pork tenderloins on top of the apples and onions, and then slide into the oven. Roast 10 to 15 minutes or until an internal thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers between 145 and 150 degrees F. Transfer the pork to a large plate and cover with aluminum foil. Let rest about 10 minutes.
  9. While the pork rests, place the pan with apples and onions back onto the stove and turn heat to medium. Add chicken stock and use a wooden spoon to scrape the pan, lifting any brown bits from the bottom. Bring to a simmer and cook until reduced by half. Add butter and stir until melted.

Recipe source: http://www.inspiredtaste.net/21117/perfect-roasted-pork-tenderloin-recipe-with-apples/

Dutch Apple Pie with Crumb Topping Recipe

We simply couldn’t have an apple recipe blog post without a recipe for an apple pie. This Dutch apple pie uses a crumb topping instead of a pastry shell topping, and boy, is it delicious! Here’s how to make it…

Ingredients:

Crust

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon shortening
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons cold water

Filling

  • 8 cups sliced cored peeled apples
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Topping

  • ½ cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup Gold Medal™ all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

Directions:

  1. In medium bowl, mix 1 cup flour and the salt. Cut in shortening, using pastry blender until particles are size of small peas. Sprinkle with cold water, 1 tablespoon at a time, tossing with fork until all flour is moistened and pastry almost leaves side of bowl (1 to 2 teaspoons more water can be added if necessary).
  2. Gather pastry into a ball. Shape into flattened round on lightly floured surface. Wrap flattened round of pastry in plastic wrap, and refrigerate about 45 minutes or until dough is firm and cold, yet pliable.
  3. Heat oven to 400°F. On surface sprinkled with flour, using floured rolling pin, roll pastry dough into circle 2 inches larger than 9-inch pie plate. Fold pastry into fourths; place in pie plate. Unfold and ease into plate, pressing firmly against bottom and side and being careful not to stretch pastry, which will cause it to shrink when baked. Trim overhanging edge of pastry 1 inch from rim of pie plate. Fold and roll pastry under, even with plate; flute as desired.
  4. In large bowl, toss filling ingredients. Pour into pie plate, mounding apples toward center.
  5. In medium bowl, use pastry blender or fingers to mix butter, 1 cup flour and the brown sugar until a crumb forms. Sprinkle evenly over top of pie. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon granulated sugar on top.
  6. Bake 45 to 55 minutes or until pie crust and crumb topping are deep golden brown and filling begins to bubble. Transfer to cooling rack to cool.

Recipe Source: https://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/dutch-apple-pie/815d821f-058d-4177-93be-e157390e947b

Apple Cinnamon Ice Cream Recipe

Ice cream lovers, rejoice…we have a recipe for apple cinnamon ice cream, and we just know you’re going to love it! Put down the pumpkin spice latte, and instead, indulge in this sweet, creamy treat that’s perfect for the fall! Check out the recipe now.

Ingredients:

Ice Cream Base

  • 2-1/4 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Cinnamon Apple Swirl

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 large apples, peeled, cored, and chopped into small, bit-sized pieces
  • 1/4 cup (packed) brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Directions:

  1. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the cream, milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and salt until well-combined. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours until thoroughly chilled.
  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Toss the apples with the brown sugar and spices and add to the skillet. Cook, stirring often, until the apples are tender, about 2-3 mins. Remove from the heat and let cool. Cover and refrigerate along with the cream base.
  3. Prior to making the ice cream, whisk the cream base a few times, and pour into an 1-1/2 quart capacity ice cream machine. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions, and churn until the ice cream is frozen and fluffy, about the consistency of soft-serve (generally 20-25 minutes). About three to five minutes before the ice cream is ready, or when the ice cream looks like it is mostly set up, carefully pour in the cinnamon-apple mixture, and continue churning.
  4. Spoon the ice cream into freezer-safe containers, and for a firmer texture, cover and freeze for an hour or two.

Recipe Source: http://www.forkknifeswoon.com/apple-cinnamon-ice-cream/

Do you have a favorite apple-inspired recipe?

Share it with us in the comments below!

Ask the Doctor- I am Currently on a Diet to Lose Weight. Will My Breasts Get Smaller Too?

This week, James E. Craigie, MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question about breast reconstruction.

Question: I am currently on a diet to lose weight. Will my breasts get smaller too?

Answer: Depending on how much  weight you lose you might notice a change. It should be minimal and proportional. You can’t “spot”reduce any one area  of the body. Therefore if you lose a moderate amount of weight you should have no problem.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

3 Fun Fall Activities in Charleston You Don’t Want to Miss

School’s back in session, pumpkin spice flavored foods and beverages are everywhere, and the NFL has finally returned to TV screens across the country.

You know what that means…

Fall is just around the corner!

Sure, it’s only the second week in September, but a bunch of fun fall activities are starting to pop up again. And things like pumpkin patches and corn mazes are only around for a limited time, so it’s best to get them on your calendar now so you don’t miss them!

To ensure you don’t miss out on all the fall fun, we’re sharing some of our favorite fall activities in Charleston, SC. If you live here or are planning a visit, we hope you’ll check some of these events out!

Boone Hall Pumpkin Patch

The Boone Hall Pumpkin Patch is located in Mount Pleasant—a 20-minute drive from downtown Charleston depending on traffic–but it’s definitely worth a visit.

It’s slightly early to get your pumpkins for Halloween, but this venue has an amazing corn maze that you won’t want to miss. It’s only $10 per person (ages 3 and up), which makes this activity affordable for the whole family.

This year, they will feature two mazes. The first maze is 8 acres and is perfect for older kids and adults. The second maze is much smaller and is great for smaller children.

If you have a fun time at the corn maze, make sure you mark your calendar to go back in October to grab yourself a pumpkin!

Click here for more info on the Boone Hall Pumpkin Patch. 

Charleston Farmer’s Market

The Charleston Farmer’s Market is open every Saturday in September. It’s a great place to stock up on fresh produce, grab a locally grown pumpkin for pumpkin carving, or purchase a fall craft from a craft vendor.

This market is held in Marion Square right outside the College of Charleston.

The best part…visiting the farmer’s market is 100% FREE and is fun for the whole family. Come enjoy the fall atmosphere and fun street music without spending a penny!

For more info on the farmer’s market, click here. 

Charleston Fall Homes and Gardens Tour

The Charleston Fall Homes and Gardens Tours don’t officially begin until October 5. However, these tours tend to sell out fast, so we want to make sure that, if you’re interested in doing a fall tour, you have plenty of time to get your tickets!

During these tours, a guide will walk you through the town of Charleston and bring you to select historic homes and gardens for your viewing pleasure. All the homes are well kept and beautifully decorated. You may even learn a thing or two about Charleston history during your tour!

Tickets start at $40. However, there are several tour packages available, so you can pick and choose what you want to spend and what you want to see.

Check out ticket prices and learn more about the tours. 

What’s your favorite fall activity in Charleston? Let us know in the comments below!

Ask the Doctor-Are Your Doctors Experienced with Tuberous Breast Deformities and Repair Without Breast Implants?

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD  of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question.

Question: Are any of your doctors experienced with tuberous breast deformities and repair without breast implants?

Answer: We don’t have specific experience with tuberous breast deformities, but I am nonetheless optimistic that we can address your concerns. The cornerstone for tuberous breast deformity reconstruction is reduction of the nipple areolar complex.

This is straightforward, and the remaining part of the equation, enlargement of the breast mound, is also well defined. If you do not want to use implants, but also want to be larger, you may have to accept some additional scars associated with transfer of natural tissue.

Otherwise, there are no particular problems. I would be happy to discuss your situation in more detail, if you wish.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

Breast Reconstruction Surgery: 16 Pre-Op Q&As from Our Physician Assistant

Breast reconstruction surgery can be scary. And we know that you’re bound to have questions about what to expect when it comes to the surgery itself and the healing process afterwards.

Thankfully, we have a handful of reconstruction surgery experts at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction. We’re thrilled that one of our very own Physician Assistant, Audrey Rowen, PA-C, takes special care to personally answer reconstruction surgery questions asked by our patients. We were particularly impressed by this group of them and wanted to share with you!

If you’re about to have breast reconstruction surgery, or are considering the option, please keep reading! We think you’ll find comfort in the answers below.

1. Where will the scars on my breasts be and will I be able to wear low-cut tops like I did before?

We try to use previous implant scars if we can, but sometimes we need to do things a little differently in order to access the blood vessels behind your breasts.

The incisions we make are generally below the nipple line and should be covered by most clothing. The shape and overall appearance of the breasts after stage 1 is not the final result so things won’t look as you are hoping until after the second stage. But, every person is different, and we will be better able to answer this question at your pre-op marking appointment and after your first surgery has been completed.

2. How long will I be in the surgical bra?

We typically keep our patients in the surgical bra for a minimum of 6-8 weeks and during any strenuous activity after that. After most healing is complete, we can switch you to a front-closing sports bra or other similar bra that provides support without being too tight. Most women wind up wearing a surgical bra through the first 2 stages and may be able to go without a surgical bra after that.

3. I think you said you could make me a C cup. I’d like you to make me as big as you can with what I have to work with.

We will do our best to give you the biggest flaps we can at the first stage. After that we can do fat grafting to increase the size of your breast. 

4. Does more fat in my tummy area make bigger, better breasts?

It can. This doesn’t mean we want you to go out and try to gain a bunch of weight before surgery because you can’t target where you want to store fat. In fact, sometimes the fat goes around your intestines or below your abdominal muscles, and we can’t get to that fat. Women who have larger tummies often have larger flaps, but we can always use liposuction to gather fat from other areas (buttocks, thighs, inner knees, waist area) at subsequent stages to add volume to the breast mounds later.

5. I understand they will not be pretty at first, but will they be lumpy or smooth, or what should I expect about how they are going to look in the beginning?

Every patient is different so the outcomes are not always standard. At the first stage, you will have what we call a “window” where the donor site flap skin is visible on your new breast. This does not mean it is an opening, but rather imagine that a piece of your skin is donor skin while the rest of your breast has your original breast skin.

This is not always permanent as we can sometimes completely close the breast skin on top of the flap, but in some patients who could not have skin-sparing mastectomies, they may always have that section of tummy skin showing.

Things stay pretty swollen for up to 2-3 months so there may be hard or squishy areas that may change throughout your recovery. We try to create a semi-smooth transition from your breast/chest skin to your donor site flap, but our main priority at stage one is to get the blood vessels attached and keep them working.

Things may look a little deformed, asymmetrical, or strange after the first stage, but we fix these issues at stage 2. You are also likely going to have what we call “dog ears” on either side of your abdominal incision from pulling the skin together. This will also be fixed at stage 2.

6. I think you said I wouldn’t need to have mammograms anymore. Is that correct?

Usually, you will not need any mammograms after having a mastectomy with reconstruction. Your oncologist often makes the definitive decision if you are at any increased risk of recurrence or need any routine monitoring. We still highly recommend doing monthly self-breast exams to monitor for any changes. If it does, please notify us or your oncologist/breast surgeon if you find anything of concern.

7. I would like to see some before and after pictures of the different stages and final result. How can I accomplish this? Can you send some to me?

We have some pictures on our website that show you the before and after photos. We do not have any designated photos of the in-between stages to show you, unfortunately. Dr. Kline may have a few extra pictures to show you at your pre-op marking appointment if you wish.

Click here to view our image gallery. 

8. Will you be lifting my left breast to make it match the right one that doesn’t sag because of the radiation?

We always take radiated breasts into consideration when making the flaps. We sometimes make a radiated breast flap a little larger to account for this, or we lift the non-radiated breast more. Most of this tweaking is done at stage 2 or 3, and there is no hard-and-fast guarantee of how the radiated tissue will do. But, we try our best to give you a symmetrical result.

9. How is the fat grafting accomplished? With needles or what?

Fat grafting is done just like traditional liposuction, but instead of throwing away the fat, it gets strained of any debris, blood vessels, etc., and gets injected back into your body, just below the skin, wherever it is needed.

We only make a small incision through which we insert a cannula that gets shifted around under your skin to collect the fat cells. We make a few incisions in the donor sites that are discussed with you before your surgery and those incisions are closed with a few stitches and a little Dermabond glue on top. The strained fat is then inserted with a special bendable needle that can be shaped to follow around a breast mound or however we need it to go to inject the fat.

10. After the fat grafting, will that fat continue to replenish itself? Like if I gain weight, will my breasts get bigger?

After liposuction, fat accumulation tends to appear in areas other than sites that you have had the fat grafting from. This doesn’t mean you will never get fat in those areas again, but it often finds its way to a few different places. Your breasts will be your own tissue and fat, so if you did gain weight, you could possibly gain weight in your breasts and the same goes for losing weight. 

11. Will my C-section ledge be gone?

We try to take other abdominal scars into consideration when finding the best placement of your new “abdominoplasty” scar. By removing the tissue located on your abdomen, there is a good chance your C-section ledge will resolve, but we cannot guarantee this. It’s another one of those things that depends on the patient, and we will have a better answer for you when we do your pre-op marking.

12. When can I drive?

We don’t want you driving as long as you have drains in (breast or abdominal), which is typically 2-3 weeks. Also, if you are taking any prescription pain medication (Percocet, Dilaudid, Valium), we don’t want you driving until you have switched to taking over-the-counter medications.

We also want to ensure that you feel you can be a defensive driver and not worry that if you had to swerve out of the way, you’d hurt something. Most women sit in the back seat away from the airbag for about 2 weeks and often place a pillow between their chest and the seatbelt to help cushion the pressure from the belt itself.

13. When can I have sex?

We don’t recommend any strenuous activity for several weeks following surgery. I would plan to wait at least 2 weeks and then see what may be tolerated. You don’t want to be using your abdominal muscles for up to 6-8 weeks so you have to be mindful of your limitations. As things heal and you progress in your recovery, you may increase activity as tolerated.

14. Can you also remove the lump of scar tissue from the four drains that were put in my rib area by the other doctors? It makes my bra roll up, and it’s uncomfortable.

Depending on the exact location, we may be able to remove it at the first stage, but it is more likely that we will look into that at second stage as the process of harvesting and grafting the blood vessels is very time-consuming and is the main priority at that time.

15. When will I know if my nipples have to be removed?

This is really a question for your breast surgeon. If you are able to have a nipple sparing mastectomy, we cannot guarantee that your nipples will live as they can sometimes scab over and become necrotic. But, there is also a good chance they will survive. In the event that one or both of your nipples needed to be removed or did not survive, we have multiple options for nipple reconstruction.

16. Can I go ahead and get my flu shot before I have my surgery?

As I am answering this, I don’t believe it is currently flu season, and we would rather not introduce anything into your body this close to surgery. I would wait until 1-2 months after surgery.

Do you have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgery that you’d like answered from our surgical team? Ask the doctor now 

Ask the Doctor – How Many Trips are Required to Have Reconstruction with Your Doctors

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD  of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question.

Question: I’ve had implants since a 2004 mastectomy following breast cancer diagnosis. I’m healthy, but feel that my implants have shifted and I’m considering a redo. I live in Colorado, and wonder how the system works for out of town patients. How many trips are required to have reconstruction with your docs?

Answer: By “considering a redo,” I’m assuming you mean replacing your implants with your own natural tissue.

Our P.A. Audrey and N.P. Lindsey spend a lot of time on the phone with out-of-town patients (and their local health care providers) before we ever see them, making sure that nothing important is overlooked before you make the trip. I recommend that at some point you and I also have a phone consultation, so that you will have an opportunity to directly ask me any questions you wish. We usually see you for the first time the day before surgery. On that morning, you get an MRI angiogram at Imaging Specialists of Charleston, then bring the disc to our office to help us plan your flap. We operate the next morning, and you usually spend 4 nights in the hospital. We recommend that you stay in town another 5 nights, if possible, although this is not absolutely required.

We actually discourage you coming back for follow-up visits, as travel is a significant risk factor for blood clots, which is a risk of the surgery (as it is for many other surgeries). If you have a local health care provider who can help with drain management (plastic surgeon, breast surgeon, primary care, etc.) that is helpful, but certainly not essential.  We stay in close contact with you via telephone and secure messaging to manage your post operative period.  You’ll send updates and photos on a routine basis and discuss your progress with our clinical staff.

Most of the time it will take at least 2-3 surgeries to complete the reconstructive process. If you are not radiated, these can be done as closely as 3 months apart (although they can be delayed as long as you wish). None of the subsequent surgeries are anywhere near as big as the initial surgery, and usually you can get by with just two nights in Charleston.

Hope this is helpful, and I hope I get the opportunity to meet you.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

3 Fresh and Fruity Dessert Recipes for Your Labor Day Weekend Picnic

In just a few days, we’ll be celebrating the unofficial end of summer, also known as Labor Day weekend. One of the most popular ways to say goodbye to the summer months—and celebrate the American Labor Movement–is to host a Labor Day picnic or family BBQ!

No gathering with family and friends is complete without dessert, so today, we’re suggesting some of our favorite fresh and fruity dessert recipes that are sure to please anybody’s taste buds.

Give them a try and let us know what you think!

Strawberry Pie Recipe

Pie is a classic and beloved American dessert and for good reason. It can be made ahead of time, is easy to throw together, and can be transported from your kitchen to any event. While there are many different types of pies you can make, we thought this recipe, featuring juicy summer strawberries is perfect for a summer picnic.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (9 inch) pie crust, baked
  • 1 quart fresh strawberries
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

Directions:

1.Arrange half of strawberries in baked pastry shell.

2. Mash remaining berries and combine with sugar in a medium saucepan. Place saucepan over medium heat and bring to a boil, stirring frequently.

3. In a small bowl, whisk together cornstarch and water. Gradually stir cornstarch mixture into boiling strawberry mixture. Reduce heat and simmer mixture until thickened, about 10 minutes, stirring constantly.

4. Pour mixture over berries in pastry shell. Chill for several hours before serving.

5. In a small bowl, whip cream until soft peaks form. Serve each slice of pie with a dollop of whipped cream.

Recipe source: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/15836/strawberry-pie-ii/

Blueberry Cobbler Recipe

We hope the only end of the summer blues you have this year are the blueberries in this delicious blueberry cobbler recipe. This 5-ingredient cobbler is easy to whip up in a pinch and travels well in a baking dish. Top it off with a little vanilla ice cream when you get to your picnic, and you’ll be in cobbler heaven!

Ingredients:

  • 6 tbs. butter, melted
  • 1 ¼ cups Original Bisquick mix
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 3 cups fresh blueberries

Directions:

1. Heat oven to 350°F. Pour melted butter into 8 or 9-inch square baking dish.

2. In medium bowl, whisk together Bisquick mix, sugar, and milk; pour over melted butter.

3. Sprinkle blueberries evenly over Bisquick batter. Bake 42 to 47 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve warm.

Recipe Source: https://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/blueberry-cobbler/081e1713-454d-4d2d-a54d-7ea9579d29b2

Fruit Pizza Recipe

You just can’t go wrong with pizza…especially dessert pizza. This tasty treat is light, fresh, and completely customizable. Follow the recipe to a “t” or pick and choose your own dessert pizza toppings. With a sweet cookie crust and a mix of fresh summer fruits and berries, we can guarantee that this fruity dessert will be a crowd pleaser.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup white sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 2 tsps. vanilla extract

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and 3/4 cup sugar until smooth. Mix in egg. combine the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt; stir into the creamed mixture until just blended. Press dough into an ungreased pizza pan.

3. Bake in preheated oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool.

4. In a large bowl, beat cream cheese with 1/2 cup sugar and vanilla until light. Spread on cooled crust.

5. Arrange desired fruit on top of filling, and chill.

Recipe Source: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/12604/fruit-pizza-i/

Do you have a favorite fruity dessert recipe? Share it with us in the comments below!

Ask the Doctor- I’m Looking For a Plastic Surgeon that Specializes in Microvascular Breast Reconstruction. Are You in my Insurance Network and Do I Have to Make a Huge Down Payment Before Surgery?

This week, Gail Lanter, CPC of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question.

Question: I am looking for a p.s. who specializes in microvas. breast recon. I had dcis in 2014 lumpectomy with 6 weeks rads followed by bilat mast. 2016 with immed. recon with expanders then implants in March. Then I got a serious infection in the left (rad) breast, had implant removed and refused to do have lat flap done.

I am thin and one ps said I might be able to do a bodylift type or one where they take from my backside and use an implant on both sides. I do not want the implant I have now. It is subpec and is painful. Can someone help? I have anthem bc/bs and you are out of network.

I do not have 8500 to have this done at another location. My insurance is agreeable to a pay if the it is in network. I can’t afford much out of pocket. We are low middle class, but don’t qualify for help.

Answer:  Hi and thanks for your inquiry. Glad you found us – you’ve definitely found a team that specializes in microvascular breast reconstruction. Regarding your insurance, does your card have a little suitcase on the lower corner of your card? If so, we’re actually in network for you utilizing the Blue Card program through our contract with BCBS of S.C.

I’m happy to check into that and assure that is the case if you would like. I’d only need a copy of the front and back of your card and some basic demographic information like – Name of insured on card and birthday if different from yours, your birthday, and address. I can run eligibility in a matter of minutes once I’ve received the information.

Also, I am sure that one of our physicians will be sending an answer to the remainder of your question very soon.

I look forward to your reply, we’d love to help you!

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

3 Healthy School Lunch Ideas Your Kids Will Love

PB&J, ham and cheese, and bologna sandwiches all have one similarity…they are the most common sandwiches that get packed into a kid’s lunchbox. But, after weeks of eating the same 3 sandwiches, lunchtime is bound to get boring.

With the school season quickly approaching for most and already started for others, we thought it might be fun to share some of our favorite and unique brown bag school lunch ideas to spice up your kid’s lunchbox.

And not to worry…all of these recipes are easy to make, can be prepared ahead of time, and are good for your kid’s growing body.

Try some of these recipes out…

Pasta Salad Recipe

Pasta salad is a great alternative to packing a sandwich every day. When made with tri-color veggie pasta, this meal will keep your kid energized and free from carbohydrate-induced blood sugar crashes throughout the day.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound tri-colored spiral pasta
  • 6 tablespoons salad seasoning mix
  • 1 (16 ounce) bottle Italian-style salad dressing
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/2 yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 (2.25 ounce) can black olives, chopped

Directions:

1. In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook pasta until al dente, rinse under cold water and drain.

2. Whisk together the salad spice mix and Italian dressing.

3. In a salad bowl, combine the pasta, cherry tomatoes, bell peppers and olives. Pour dressing over salad; toss and refrigerate overnight.

Recipe Source: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/14385/pasta-salad/

 

Crunchy Veggie Rice Paper Wraps Recipe

If your kids are a fan of Asian-inspired dishes, they will love to find these crunchy veggie rice paper wraps in their lunchbox. The best part…these wraps can be made a few days in advance and will keep fresh in your fridge.

Ingredients:

  • 15 rice paper sheets (6 inch)
  • 1⁄2 cup green cabbage, finely chopped
  • 1⁄2 cup fresh carrot, finely chopped
  • 1⁄2 cup sweet onion, finely chopped
  • 1⁄4 cup celery, finely chopped
  • 1⁄4 cup sweet green pepper, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons black sesame seeds
  • 5 ounces imitation crabmeat (optional) or 5 ounces shrimp, chopped (optional)
  • Oriental sweet chili sauce (or any other favorite spicy sauce, allow 1/2 – 1 tsp per roll)

 

Directions:

1. Mix all the ingredients except rice paper and Chili sauce. Shortly before serving soften each rice paper wrap separately. Do this by submerging the wrap in a bowl of warm water for a minute of two.

2. When it is pliable it is ready, so remove that one from the water and drop in another one.

3. Lay out a couple of paper towels and place the softened wrap on the towel.

4. Don’t rub it; just place it on the towel. Place 1-2 tbsp. of the veggie mix in the center of the wrap and add 1/2- 1 tsp. sweet chili sauce.

5. Fold up the bottom and then fold in the sides and roll to form a sealed roll.

Recipe Source: http://www.food.com/recipe/crunchy-veggie-rice-paper-wraps-89246

 

Whole Wheat Waffle Strips Recipe

Breakfast foods are one of our favorites. So, we thought, why not pack them for lunch? This whole wheat waffle recipe is easy to make and is a treat any kid would love to take to school. Throw in some cut-up fruit and a yogurt as sides, and you’ve got a well-balanced meal in a box.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour or Gluten-Free Measure for Measure Flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 1/2 cups lukewarm milk
  • 1/3 cup melted butter or vegetable oil

Directions:

1. Preheat your iron while you make the waffle batter.

2. Whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar.

3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg, milk, and butter or oil.

4. Mix together the wet and dry ingredients, stirring just until combined. The batter will be a bit lumpy; that’s OK.

5. Cook the waffles as directed in the instructions that came with your waffle iron.

6. Cut waffles into strips, put the strips in a container, and throw the container into your kid’s lunchbox. Option to add a smaller container of maple syrup if desired.

Recipe Source: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/whole-wheat-waffles-recipe

Do you have any unique lunchbox recipes your kids love? Share them with us in the comments below!

 

 

Ask the Doctor- I am Unhappy with my Previous Bilateral Mastectomy with Reconstruction Using Implants. Are you Able to Fix it?

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question.

Question: I’m not happy with the results of my bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction using implants. Reaching out to see if it can be fixed.

Answer:  It is very likely that we could help you with your unsatisfactory reconstruction, either by using your own tissue, or by revising your implant reconstruction. I will be happy to discuss your situation in more detail by phone, if you wish.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!