3 Delicious Charleston Culinary Food Tours

charleston food

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If there’s one thing Charleston has gained prominence for, it’s the city’s food!

From traditional Southern fare and delicious seafood to farm-to-table dinners and innovative cocktails, Charleston’s burgeoning culinary scene has received attention from the likes of Bon Appétit, Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, and Food & Wine magazine.

In AFAR magazine’s words, “Charleston is home to world-famous chefs, as well as restaurants that have been preparing time-tested recipes for generations. This is a city that celebrates both haute cuisine and Lowcountry fare.”

Whether you’re a local or visitor to Charleston, read on–because today, we’re going to give you our picks for three of the city’s most enticing food tours.

Happy reading–and bon appétit!

#1: Downtown Charleston Culinary Tour

culinary tours

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Looking for a culinary tour that includes a healthy dose of local Charleston history?

The Downtown Charleston Culinary Tour would be right up your alley!

On this tour, you’ll stop at 4 restaurants over the course of 2.5 hours to sample a wide range of delicious dishes and beverages that are sure to fill you up.

Each restaurant stop will give you the chance to rest your legs, taste delectable dishes such as sliders and pies, and hear from the restaurant staff and chefs.

In addition to the fantastic cuisine and fascinating historical information, reviewers of the tour consistently mention the magnetic energy and liveliness of the tour company’s guides.

Individual tickets are $60–click here to learn more and book your spot!

#2: Savor the Flavors of Charleston Food Walking Tour

Savour Flavors

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Bulldog Tours’ Savor the Flavors of Charleston Food Walking Tour is, as one TripAdvisor reviewer puts it, “worth your time.”

As you stop by local restaurants, markets, and bakeries over the course of two and a half hours, you’ll have the opportunity to taste local delicacies ranging from grits to South Carolina barbecue.

With no shortage of samples, you’ll get in a full meal’s worth of food.

And for mixology, beer, and wine enthusiasts, you will have the opportunity to purchase alcoholic beverages along the way.

Individual tickets are $65–reserve your spot and learn more here!

#3: Farm-to-Table Experience

farm to table

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For all of you organic, fresh, and local food devotees, the Farm-to-Table Experience from Charleston Culinary Tours is a must.

This farm-to-table experience combines the talents of renowned local chefs with fresh produce, dairy, and other food products available at a Travel + Leisure-appraised Charleston farmers market.

Over the course of three hours, the tour will play out as follows…

  • A tour guide and that day’s participating chef will lead the group to the farmers market to pick out the freshest ingredients the market has to offer.
  • From there, you’ll follow your guide as he or she takes you on a 45-minute walking tour of the city. Meanwhile, the chef will prepare a multicourse meal utilizing the ingredients purchased at the market.
  • At the end, you and your fellow participants will sit down to a scrumptious and healthy brunch–a true farm-to-table experience!

Individual tickets cost $75–learn more and claim your spot here!

These tours are incredibly popular, and space is limited–so don’t hesitate to make your reservation.

Do you have another culinary tour to recommend? Tell us about it in the comments below!

Ask The Doctor – I Recently Received Concerning Results on a Mammogram. Should I Wait the Recommended 6 Months to Discuss Implant Removal or Begin the Process Now?

pink rose

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question about breast reconstruction.

Question: I am a 61-year-old female with breast implants that were placed in 1986. I have been pregnant 6 times, 5 c-sections and one miscarriage. 2 infant deaths and 3 living children. I was able to breastfeed 4 of my children. Approximately 4-5 years ago I had an abnormal mammogram.  (I am in the process of obtaining those records) I underwent an ultrasound to the left breast and was informed that everything was “ok”. Following mammogram was normal. I retired from nursing 2 years ago and moved from Virginia to West Virginia. My most recent mammogram 5/2/2018 stated “There are bilateral breast implants. There is mild to moderate residual parenchyma tissue bilaterally. There is an asymmetric parenchyma nodule in each breast anteriorly, most likely benign. Six month bilateral mammogram advised to confirm stability.” Doctor, I’m not sure I should wait another six months or peruse implant removal and breast tissue removal. You know us nurses “overthink”. I’d like to know if you have another suggestion vs wait for the next mammogram. Thank you so much for you’re valuable time and consideration.

Answer:

Thank you so much for your question. It sounds like you are getting frustrated, and it’s easy to see why.

We don’t actually treat breast cancer per se, we just do reconstruction, so I can’t actually recommend a particular imaging technique or schedule. I can, however, recommend that you see a surgical oncologist who treats breast diseases (if you haven’t already), as they often have a good “feel” from experience for how to manage these type situations. They see many, many images, and, unlike radiologists, later correlate many of those images with what they see in surgery, which gives them a unique perspective. He or she may recommend an MRI or ultrasound, or may just agree with your previous recommendations, but even that might be reassuring.

Thanks again for your question, and have a great weekend!

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

Breast Reconstruction: What Are My Options after an Unsuccessful Reconstructive Surgery?

Making the decision to undergo breast reconstruction surgery is a decision that is not taken lightly.

That’s why it breaks our hearts when we discover that there are women out there who are unhappy with their reconstructive results.

Over the past few months, we’ve heard from several ladies who want to know what their options are when their surgery doesn’t turn out as planned.

We thought our insight would be helpful to others who are facing the same problems as these courageous women.

Here are our answers to what your options are after an unsuccessful reconstructive surgery.

What Are My Reconstruction Options after a Failed Implant Reconstruction?

Question: Do you do reconstruction after ex-plants from a ruptured implant?

Answer: If you have had mastectomies, we will attempt to do reconstruction no matter what has happened, as long as you want it, and it’s medically safe to do so.

If your breast sustained damage from a ruptured implant placed for cosmetic reasons, we will still be happy to help you, but this might not be covered by your insurance.

I hope this helps.

See the full post here.

I’m Unhappy with My Reconstructive Result from Another Surgeon – Are You Able to Make It Look More Natural?

Question: Three years ago, I had a double mastectomy and am now cancer free.

My plastic surgeon did a terrible job with the reconstruction.

The left side implant is way off to the outer side and looks larger than the right side. The right side is way too far to the outside. There is zero cleavage.

Is there any way to reposition the implants more to the natural position of the breast?

I do not expect perfect, but don’t like looking like a botched job. Thank you.

Answer:  I’m glad to hear you have been cancer free and have your treatment for breast cancer behind you.

At The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction, it is part of our mission to help women move on with their lives after breast cancer. We focus our efforts on helping women get their bodies back together with permanent “natural results.”

I’m sorry you are disappointed with your reconstruction.

If you have had radiation, then it may be very hard to have your breasts match with implant reconstruction. If you have not had radiation, then perhaps your implants could be revised or adjusted for an improvement.

Unfortunately, these corrections are all too often temporary. It is possible that using your own fatty tissue would be a more permanent option without implants.

Sometimes it is hard to start over with another approach, but it may be necessary if you desire a more natural and permanent result.

If you would like more information about natural breast reconstruction with your own tissue, let me know.

See the full post here.

I Have Implants But They Feel Horrible and My Reconstruction Looks Terrible. Is There Any Hope after Reconstruction?

Question:  I have implants. I do not like them, they feel horrible, and my reconstruction looks terrible.

Is there any hope after reconstruction?

Answer:  Fortunately, your previous experiences with implants in all probability do not affect our ability to get you a satisfactory reconstruction using only your own tissue.

See the full post here.

Do you have breast reconstruction questions? Send us your questions here

Ask the Doctor – What Can Be Done To Fix a Previous Radiated Breast with Implant?

This week, James E. Craigie, MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question.

Question: What can be done for a 2004 radiated breast with implant. As common, it has encapsulated to a high degree and is painful, misshaped and raised, looking very unnatural. Thank you

Answer:  Without question, the course of action most likely to work is to remove the implant and proceed with reconstruction using your own tissue. If you still have breast tissue remaining, it can be removed by a breast surgeon at the same time that your healthy tissue is transferred.

The most common source for the new tissue (the “flap”) is the abdomen, which is usually harvested as a DIEP flap. If the abdomen is not available or not adequate, then the buttocks (“sGAP flap”) can often be used. Our success rates over the last 13 years are 99.07% using the DIEP flap, and 95.7% using the sGAP flap. The initial surgery requires on average 4 nights in the hospital, but subsequent stages are much easier.

If you can’t or don’t want to use your own tissue, there are a couple of other options which may offer some hope, although the chances of success are nowhere near as good as using your own tissue. One is a course of hyperbaric oxygen, which has been shown to bring new blood vessels to the radiated tissue.

Another potential option, which must be regarded as experimental at this point, would be to completely cover the implant with acellular dermal matrix, or “ADM” (Alloderm being the most commonly used variety). This material has some efficacy in preventing contracture, but the effect would be less pronounced in radiated tissue.

Hope this helps. I would be happy to discuss your situation further with you, if you wish.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

5 Books to Add to Your Summer Reading List

reading

Summer…

The perfect time to relax poolside (or on the beach like us in Charleston) and catch up on some reading.

Not sure what to read?

No problem–we’ve got you covered.

Check out these 5 books we recommend you add to your summer reading list.

#1 – The Woman in the Window

 

the woman in the window

If you enjoy thriller novels, A.J. Finn’s book, The Woman in the Window, is a must-read for you this summer.

This book starts out with the main character, Anna Fox, spying on her neighbors from her Harlem townhouse.

Poor Anna suffers from agoraphobia and is house-bound.

While watching her neighbor, she believes she witnesses a crime.

Was she right? If so, what was the crime and who did it?

Read the book to find out!

See if it’s in your local library or order it here.

#2 – Girl, Wash Your Face

girl wash your face

As women, we tell ourselves a lot of lies.

For instance, you might have said to yourself…

  • “I’m not good enough.
  • “I’m not thin enough.
  • “I’m not a good parent.

If you have, this honest, yet light-hearted look into the lies we tell ourselves each day is a must-read.

Join author Rachel Hollis as she gives advice on how to get rid of a limiting mindset that destroys self-confidence and keeps you from moving forward.

See if it’s in your local library or order it here.

#3 – Little Women

little women

There’s nothing quite like revisiting the treasured classic Little Women.

In this epic tale, you’ll take a journey with the author Louisa May Alcott who tells the story of what it was like for her and her three sisters to grow up in Concord, Massachusetts, in the 1860s.

All in all, the story tells of how the sisters grow up, find love, and find their place in the world.

See if it’s in your local library or order it here.

#4 – Brave New World

brave new world

Brave New World, written by Aldous Huxley, is based on a scientific empire that manufactures its citizens in the laboratory on a eugenic basis.

The story follows the fortunes of John, the illegitimate son of a senior governor, who has grown up in America, outside the new empire.

Will John be able to find a place in this new society?

Find out by reading the book!

See if it’s in your local library or order it here.

#5 – Yes Please

yes please

If you’re in need of a laugh, we highly recommend picking up a copy of Amy Poehler’s book, Yes Please.

In this book, Amy shares comical and heartwarming stories about life, her time on SNL, and being a woman in show business.

Regardless of whether you know Amy from SNL or movies, she shares many stories that any woman (in show business or not) can relate to and connect with.

See if it’s in your local library or order it here.

What are your favorite books? Let us know in the comments below!

Ask the Doctor – Can I Have Large, Under Muscle Implants Replaced With Smaller Ones? Will This Make Them More Comfortable?

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question about breast reconstruction.

Question: I’ve had my breast tissues removed and I now have implants. They are under my muscles, too large and very uncomfortable. Is there anything you can do to fix this and make a smaller implant? I am very unhappy with the way my breasts look, This is contributing to already very low self-esteem issues. Can you help me? What are my options?

Answer:  There is an excellent chance that we can help you. The country is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in implant-based breast reconstruction, with more and more surgeons placing the implants in front of the muscle, rather than behind. This allows for numerous potential advantages, and few disadvantages. We have been converting patients with unsatisfactory sub-muscular reconstructions to reconstructions in front of the muscle for a few years, with generally good-to-excellent results.

Another option is to remove your implants and re-build your breasts only with your own natural tissue, usually from tummy or buttocks. This is a larger operation than implant reconstruction but obviously results in an even more natural result.

I would be happy to discuss your situation further with you by phone, if you wish, or see you in my office when convenient.

Thanks for your question.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

3 Tasty and Refreshing Homemade Ice Cream Sandwich Recipes

icecream sandwiches

I scream…

You scream…

We all scream for ice cream!

Satisfy your ice cream cravings with the following tasty and refreshing homemade ice cream sandwich recipes…

S’mores Ice Cream Sandwiches

Smores icecream

Nobody should have to choose between eating a delicious bowl of ice cream or an ooey gooey s’more.

For that reason, we suggest combining the two classic summertime desserts into a s’mores ice cream sandwich.

Here’s how to make this yummy treat…

Ingredients:

  • 7 ounces miniature marshmallows (about 4 cups)
  • Cooking spray
  • 2 cups half-and-half
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon fat-free milk
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable shortening
  • 2 teaspoons light-colored corn syrup
  • 6 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa
  • 8 graham crackers, halved crosswise

Directions:

  1. Preheat broiler to high.
  2. Place marshmallows in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with parchment coated with cooking spray. Broil 30 seconds or until golden brown and toasted. Cool.
  3. Combine half-and-half and granulated sugar in a saucepan over medium-high heat; bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Place yolks in a medium bowl; stir with a whisk until smooth. Gradually add hot half-and-half mixture to egg yolks, stirring constantly with a whisk.
  4. Return egg mixture to pan; cook over medium heat 6 minutes or until mixture thickens slightly and reaches 160°, stirring constantly.
  5. Strain through a fine sieve into a large bowl set over a larger ice water-filled bowl. Let stand until cold, stirring occasionally. Place half-and-half mixture, marshmallows, and vanilla in a blender; process until smooth.
  6. Chill mixture 3 hours.
  7. Pour marshmallow mixture into the freezer can of an ice-cream freezer; freeze according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  8. Line an 11 x 7-inch freezer-safe dish with plastic wrap, allowing wrap to extend over ends of dish; spread ice cream in bottom of dish.
  9. Freeze 3 hours or until firm and then enjoy!

Recipe Source: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/smores-ice-cream-sandwiches-0

Fruity Pebbles Ice Cream Sandwiches

fruity pebbles icecream

We firmly believe that the two most important meals of the day are breakfast and dessert!

So, why not mix these two mealtime staples together?

Indulge your sweet tooth with this sweet, cereal-coated ice cream sandwich.

Give it a try…

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 10 oz. bag marshmallows
  • 6 c. Fruity Pebbles cereal
  • 1 pt. vanilla ice cream

Directions:

  1. Grease a medium sheet pan.
  2. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt butter. Once completely melted, add marshmallows and stir until completely melted and smooth. Remove from heat and quickly stir in Fruity Pebbles until well coated.
  3. Using wax paper or spatula, press mixture into sheet pan until about 1/2″ thick. Let cool at least 20 minutes.
  4. Using a cookie or biscuit cutter, punch out 8 circles.
  5. Place 1 big scoop of vanilla ice cream in between two Fruity Pebble circles and press down. Repeat to make 3 more sandwiches.
  6. Freeze until ready to serve.

Recipe Source: https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a47654/fruity-pebbles-ice-cream-sandwiches-recipe/

Blueberry Pie Ice Cream Sandwiches

blueberry icecream

Add fruit to your ice cream, and your dessert automatically becomes healthy, right?

We think so!

Get a full serving of antioxidant-rich blueberries when you give this delicious blueberry ice cream sandwich a try.

Here’s how it’s made…

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 5 tbs. sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 1/2 sticks cold, unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup of ice water
  • 2 cups of blueberries
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice
  • pinch of lemon zest
  • 1 tsp. cornstarch
  • 1 egg
  • vanilla ice cream

Directions:

  1. Sift flour, sugar and salt into the bowl of a food processor. Cube cold butter into small squares and place inside food processor.
  2. Pulse until butter is no larger than the size of a pea.
  3. Slowly stream ice water in the feeder, a few tablespoons at a time, until the dough just slightly starts to hold together. If the dough is a bit too wet, meaning it sticks to your hands when you pick it up, you can dip your hands in some flour and give it a few good kneads.
  4. Divide the dough in two, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for a couple of hours.
  5. Toss blueberries in lemon juice, zest and cornstarch and set aside.
  6. Preheat oven to 350° F and line the bottom of a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  7. Dust a surface with flour and roll out one of the dough halves until it’s very thin but not too fragile.
  8. Use a round cutter (I used a 2.5″ biscuit cutter) and cut out 20 rounds
  9. Place 10 on the baking sheet and spoon a few blueberries onto each round.
  10. Cover the blueberries with the other 10 pie crust rounds and press down the edges. I like to use the end of a chopstick, dipped in flour. If the two crusts don’t stick, you can seal them with an egg wash.
  11. Once all the pie cookies are sealed, brush with an egg wash.
  12. Bake for 15-18 minutes or until the pies are a nice golden brown.
  13. Cool on a wire rack for a few hours.
  14. Sandwich a small scoop of vanilla ice cream between two pie cookies.
  15. Serve immediately or keep covered in the freezer until ready to serve.

Recipe Source: https://honestlyyum.com/13887/blueberry-pie-ice-cream-sandwiches/

What is your favorite type of ice cream sandwich? Share with us in the comments below!

Ask the Doctor – How Long Should You Have a Breast Expander In?

Lymphedema after mastectomy

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question about breast reconstruction.

Question: How long should you have a breast expander in?

Answer: There is no “one size fits all” answer to your question.

In many cases, expansion can be achieved, and the permanent implant placed, in 2-3 months (more commonly 3).

In other cases, expansion may take longer, or sometimes other factors such as radiation may cause delays in removing the expander and placing the permanent implant. Whenever possible, however, expansion should be completed before the beginning of radiation, because the expansion of radiated skin ranges from difficult to impossible.

I do not think that having expanders in for long periods is likely to cause any lasting problem, although the chance of them deflating goes up. I met a patient recently who, for various reasons, had had an expander placed by another surgeon in place for 15 years. She appeared none the worse for it, we placed a permanent implant, and she is doing well.

Hope this helps, I’d be happy to chat with you if you wish.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered by our surgical team? Just ask!

3 Common Questions about Breast Reconstruction Pain and Discomfort

After breast reconstruction surgery, patients are bound to experience some sort of recovery pain or discomfort.

This mild pain often leads patients to ask questions such as…

  • How long will the pain last?
  • Is my pain normal?
  • Should I call my doctor?

At the time, a person’s pain or discomfort might seem unusual or scary…and the last thing we want is for patients to worry.

For that reason, we’ve decided to put together the answers to a few of our most common pain-related questions.

Find out what our surgeons and staff have to say about the following concerns…

What Are Your Suggestions for Muscle Spasms after Breast Reconstruction?

Question: I had breast reconstruction on my left breast in 2006. I have had muscle spasms in it ever since. Recently they have gotten bad again.

Any suggestions?

Answer: I’m sorry you are having problems with your reconstruction.

You didn’t mention if you were reconstructed with an implant or with your own tissue, so I will answer as if you are reconstructed with an implant. Please let me know if I have assumed wrongly.

There are several potential reasons why you could have spasms.

If the implant was placed under the pectoralis chest muscle, it can lead to pains in the pectoralis muscle or other muscles, as the muscle is no longer functioning in precisely the way it was designed to. Most people tolerate the implants well, but there is no question some have more problems than others.

The muscle can also sometimes separate from attachments to the chest wall over time, which could cause changes in symptoms.

Additionally, if you are radiated, this could potentially cause additional problems, as the muscle may be less flexible.

View the full post here.

I’m Having Pain after My Last Latissimus Flap/Implant Reconstruction. What Can I Do Now?

Question: I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011 and had a mastectomy on my left side followed by chemo.

In 2014, my mammogram began showing tumors and I would have an ultrasound every time. This caused panic attacks and I choose to have my right breast removed because the type of cancer I had was Stage 4 Aggressive.

In April 2015, I had a bilateral latissimus flat and received implants. Now I am experiencing pain across my back where I was cut and my chest gets uncomfortably tight.

The site of the drainage tube is swollen and doesn’t feel good. I stopped seeing my reconstruction doctor because he did things I was not informed of. I am worried because I do not know what is going on anymore.

Could you please advise me as to what might be going on or what to do?

Answer: I’m sorry you are continuing to have problems, but you are not alone.

I can’t speak about your situation specifically because I haven’t examined you, but here are some thoughts in general about patients with symptoms like yours.

There is no question that many people with implants describe symptoms such as yours. Often, there is no discernible reason why they should feel discomfort, but they do. Nonetheless, many of them feel relief when the implants are removed. This does not mean that you would or should, it is just an observation.

The latissimus flap can be done with or without dividing the nerve that makes it contract. I have known some patients with latissimus flaps done without dividing the nerve to have discomfort associated with the muscle contracting. Some have experienced relief when the nerve was subsequently divided. Obviously, I don’t know if this is your situation or not.

Sometimes people have complex, persistent pain after surgery or injury which is out of all proportion to what would be expected. This can be difficult to treat but thankfully is rare.

When evaluating a patient with symptoms like yours, we usually start with a careful history and physical evaluation.

Sometimes, especially if we have concerns about implant rupture, fluid collections, infection, etc., we then get an MRI and/or CT scan. Following the complete evaluation, we then decide together how to proceed.

View the full post here.

Are These Normal Problems to Have 2 Years after a Breast Reduction?

Question: I had a breast reduction over two years ago. It still feels like I have scar tissue in some areas and nipple tends to be a little sore at times.

Is that normal?

Answer: No, that’s not normal, and I’m sorry you’re having to endure it.

I can’t tell what is going on by your description, but it’s possible that you have some residual dead fat in your breasts which has not been resorbed.

An MRI scan would be the best way to determine this.

It’s also possible that you have pain for no discernible reason, which is unusual, but it happens from time to time. That doesn’t mean it can’t be treated, however, as pain therapists can be very effective in helping manage that type of pain.

View the full post here.

Do you have breast reconstruction questions? Send us your questions here!

Ask The Doctor – Do You Perform DIEP Free Flap Procedure Without Cutting Or Harvesting Muscle Tissue and Do You Accept BCBS Reimbursement?

White orchidsThis week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question about breast reconstruction.

Question: Do you perform the DIEP free flap procedure without cutting or harvesting any muscle tissue? How many of these are performed by the physicians per year? Do you accept the BCBS reimbursement rates for this procedure?

Answer:

Thanks for your inquiry.

My partner and I are both trained directly by Dr. Robert Allen, the inventor of the DIEP (and sGAP, iGAP, PAP, etc.). He still drops by and operates with us occasionally. We will NEVER take any muscle tissue. However, with rare exceptions (dictated only by individual anatomy), it is impossible to harvest a DIEP without temporarily dividing part of the rectus abdominus muscle (although this almost never results in any functional impairment). If you have read or heard otherwise, that source is simply incorrect. I would be happy to discuss this with anyone who feels otherwise.

We currently perform (150 – 170) perforator flaps for breast reconstruction each year. We have performed a total of about 1700 flaps, of which about 1400 are DIEPs, about 300 are GAPs, and a few are PAPs, tDAPs, etc. Our DIEP survival rate when last calculated was 99.08%, our sGAP survival rate 95.7%. I would not be surprised if these were the best flap survival statistics in the world, but of course I can’t be sure, because we don’t know the details of other groups’ statistics.

We accept insurance as full payment from all carriers doing business in SC, and we are usually “in network by proxy” (or something like that) with all other carriers in the US.

We happily accept patients who have been operated on unsuccessfully by other physicians, no matter how many times, and no matter how bad the situation may seem.

I would be happy to discuss the particulars of your situation with you by phone or in person at any time.

Thanks again for your question, and have a great weekend!

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!