The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction Gives Thanks

On behalf of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction, we wish you and your family a very Happy Thanksgiving.

We hope you are able to spend time this week with the ones you love, eating delicious food and reflecting on the many things you are grateful for!

Over the last few weeks, we’ve spent some time thinking about the things that we are truly grateful for. And in honor of this holiday of giving thanks, we wanted to share our list with you.

How many things do we have in common on our lists? Keep reading to find out…

#1 — The opportunity to work with so many courageous women who have battled breast cancer.

First and foremost, we are so thankful that we get to work with such amazing women each and every day. Their stories inspire us, their smiles brighten our day, and it is truly a gift to be able to interact with each and every one of the ladies we work with.

Read the stories from some amazing women here.

#2 — Our team of highly skilled staff and medical professionals.

We never take for granted the amazing staff and medical professionals that we have on our team. We are thankful that we have kind, hardworking, and highly skilled professionals that are able to give our clients the best care they deserve.

#3 — Our health.

Every day we work with women who have fought courageous battles against cancer. And every time we hear a new patient’s story, we are reminded of how lucky we are to have our health.

#4 — Our friends and family.

From loving spouses and children to awesome coworkers and friends, we are thankful to be surrounded by those who love us each day.

#5 — Our freedoms.

We are thankful for all the freedoms we have. From access to the technology and education we need to serve our patients to being able to pursue our passion to help women recover and heal from breast cancer, we are truly blessed.

#6 — Delicious food.

Last, but certainly not least, we are thankful for the delicious Thanksgiving meal we will be indulging in this week. There’s nothing better than chowing down on our Thanksgiving favorites while surrounded by the people we love.

Need some inspiration of what to bring to your Thanksgiving table this year? Here are some of our favorite holiday recipes!

This year, when you’re gathered around your Thanksgiving dinner table, we encourage you to share the things you’re grateful for with your loved ones.

Once again, Happy Thanksgiving from our family to yours! We hope you have a wonderful holiday!

What are you thankful for? Let us know in the comments below!

Ask the Doctor- I’m Having Pain After My Last Latissimus Flap/Implant Reconstruction. What Can I Do Now?

This week, Richard M. Kline, Jr., MD, of The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction answers your question about breast reconstruction.

Question: I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011, and had a mastectomy on my left side followed by chemo. In 2014, my mammogram began showing tumors and I would have an ultrasound every time. This caused panic attacks and I choose to have my right breast removed because the type of cancer I had was Stage 4 Aggressive. In April 2015, I had a bilateral latissimus flat and received implants. Now I am experiencing pain across my back where I was cut and my chest gets uncomfortably tight. The site of the drainage tube is swollen and doesn’t feel good. I stopped seeing my reconstruction doctor because he did things I was not informed of. I am worried because I do not know what is going on anymore. Could you please advise me as to what might be going on or what to do?

Answer: I’m sorry you are continuing to have problems, but you are not alone.

I can’t speak about your situation specifically because I haven’t examined you, but here are some thoughts in general about patients with symptoms like yours.

There is no question that many people with implants describe symptoms such as yours. Often, there is no discernible reason why they should feel discomfort, but they do. Nonetheless, many of them feel relief when the implants are removed. This does not mean that you would or should, it is just an observation.

The latissimus flap can be done with or without dividing the nerve that makes it contract. I have known some patients with latissimus flaps done without dividing the nerve to have discomfort associated with the muscle contracting. Some have experienced relief when the nerve was subsequently divided. Obviously, I don’t know if this is your situation or not.

Sometimes people have complex, persistent pain after surgery or injury which is out of all proportion to what would be expected. This can be difficult to treat but thankfully is rare.

When evaluating a patient with symptoms like yours, we usually start with a careful history and physical evaluation. Sometimes, especially if we have concerns about implant rupture, fluid collections, infection, etc., we then get an MRI and/or CT scan Following the complete evaluation, we then decide together how to proceed.

Hope this helps at least a little. I would be happy to chat with you further by phone about your specific problem or see you in person if you can come for a visit.

Have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgical you’d like answered from our surgical team? Just ask!

Our Surgeons Show Support for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month. And it’s important that we take the time to remember those who have lost their lives to breast cancer, support those who are battling it, and celebrate those who have won their cancer battle.

One of the ways The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction likes to celebrate is to get involved in community events that are focused on breast cancer awareness.

This year we’ve been invited to participate in a series of Breast Cancer symposiums. We are thrilled that two of our surgeons, Dr. Craigie and Dr. Kline, will be included in the panel for these discussions.

All of the Charleston, SC, community is invited to attend these talks, and we encourage you to attend if you are able!

Check out the details below…

East Cooper Breast Cancer Symposium – October 4

The first Breast Cancer educational symposium will be held at the East Cooper Medical Center. The event will take place in the classrooms at the hospital, limiting registration to about 40 people.

During this event, a panel of medical experts will be talking about a variety of breast cancer topics, from treatment and prevention to reconstructive surgeries and life after breast cancer.

The facility will be serving boxed dinners for participants to enjoy during the panel talk, which will take place from 6:00 p.m. to around 8:00 p.m.

Space is limited, so if you’re interested in attending please call the East Cooper Medical Center at (888) 417-1377 to find out how to register for the event.

Breast Reconstruction Awareness Day Talks – October 17, 18, and 19

To celebrate Breast Reconstruction Awareness Day (BRA day), three talks on breast reconstruction will be held over the course of three days—October 17, 18, and 19.

All three events will feature medical professionals and surgeons who are active members of Roper’s breast cancer team. The topics of discussion will focus on reconstructive breast surgery.

A few featured topics include…

  • A presentation on fat grafting.
  • A discussion on Micro Autologous.
  • A talk on lymph node transfer.

The first talk will be held on Tuesday, October 17, at 6:30 p.m. at Roper Mount Pleasant in Classrooms 1, 2, and 3. For more information, click here.

The second talk will be held on Wednesday, October 18, at 6:30 p.m. at Roper Bon Secours St. Francis, Mall Classrooms 1, 2, and 3. For more information, click here.

The third talk will be held on Thursday, October 19, at 6:30 p.m. at Roper Hospital, Irene Dixon Auditorium. For more information, click here.

Please note that the same talks will be given each night, so it’s only necessary to attend one event if you have an interest in going.

On behalf of our entire staff, we wish you a happy National Breast Cancer Awareness month. And to those of you who are currently battling breast cancer, our thoughts are with you.

Do you have any National Breast Cancer Awareness month activities on your schedule that you’re excited about?

Share them with us in the comments below!

Finding Beauty After Breast Cancer: Register for a Free Class at Sephora

 

 Our surgeons and staff at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction know firsthand how difficult a battle with breast cancer can be.

From the moment you’re diagnosed, everything changes. Your emotional, mental, and psychological health is instantly impacted. And throughout your breast cancer journey, your physical appearance is also bound to change.

This transformation can unfortunately leave a lot of woman no longer feeling confident in their own skin.

While we believe that all women—no matter their journey—are beautiful, we also know that a little pampering and some fun with makeup can go a long way in making you feel radiant and confident.

With National Breast Cancer Awareness month in full swing, there are numerous educational talks, fundraisers, and events going on. If you’re in the Charleston, SC, area, we’d like to personally invite you to a special event at Sephora on King Street.

We are joining forces with Sephora in order to promote their FREE Brave Beauty class for women who have battled cancer.

The event will take place on Sunday, October 29, at 6:30 p.m. at the Sephora on King Street. The official address is 289 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401.

This 90-minute Brave Beauty class is designed to help you discover techniques and products that address the visible effects of your cancer treatments.

During this event, you’ll be given skincare tips tailored to your needs and then will be matched with Color IQ and receive step-by-step instructions for a creating a radiant complexion, natural-looking brows, and defined eyes.

If you’re interested in attending, we encourage you to check out this awesome video from Sephora that features cancer survivor Emily as she explains why attending a Brave Beauty class is a great way to celebrate how beautiful you truly are.

Watch the video here!

If you’re interested in signing up, please contact us at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction to register, and we will pass your information along to the event host.

You can get in touch with us here.

Do you have any tips or tricks for feeling confident and radiant after a battle with cancer?

Share them with us in the comments below!

Breast Reconstruction Surgery: 16 Pre-Op Q&As from Our Physician Assistant

Breast reconstruction surgery can be scary. And we know that you’re bound to have questions about what to expect when it comes to the surgery itself and the healing process afterwards.

Thankfully, we have a handful of reconstruction surgery experts at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction. We’re thrilled that one of our very own Physician Assistant, Audrey Rowen, PA-C, takes special care to personally answer reconstruction surgery questions asked by our patients. We were particularly impressed by this group of them and wanted to share with you!

If you’re about to have breast reconstruction surgery, or are considering the option, please keep reading! We think you’ll find comfort in the answers below.

1. Where will the scars on my breasts be and will I be able to wear low-cut tops like I did before?

We try to use previous implant scars if we can, but sometimes we need to do things a little differently in order to access the blood vessels behind your breasts.

The incisions we make are generally below the nipple line and should be covered by most clothing. The shape and overall appearance of the breasts after stage 1 is not the final result so things won’t look as you are hoping until after the second stage. But, every person is different, and we will be better able to answer this question at your pre-op marking appointment and after your first surgery has been completed.

2. How long will I be in the surgical bra?

We typically keep our patients in the surgical bra for a minimum of 6-8 weeks and during any strenuous activity after that. After most healing is complete, we can switch you to a front-closing sports bra or other similar bra that provides support without being too tight. Most women wind up wearing a surgical bra through the first 2 stages and may be able to go without a surgical bra after that.

3. I think you said you could make me a C cup. I’d like you to make me as big as you can with what I have to work with.

We will do our best to give you the biggest flaps we can at the first stage. After that we can do fat grafting to increase the size of your breast. 

4. Does more fat in my tummy area make bigger, better breasts?

It can. This doesn’t mean we want you to go out and try to gain a bunch of weight before surgery because you can’t target where you want to store fat. In fact, sometimes the fat goes around your intestines or below your abdominal muscles, and we can’t get to that fat. Women who have larger tummies often have larger flaps, but we can always use liposuction to gather fat from other areas (buttocks, thighs, inner knees, waist area) at subsequent stages to add volume to the breast mounds later.

5. I understand they will not be pretty at first, but will they be lumpy or smooth, or what should I expect about how they are going to look in the beginning?

Every patient is different so the outcomes are not always standard. At the first stage, you will have what we call a “window” where the donor site flap skin is visible on your new breast. This does not mean it is an opening, but rather imagine that a piece of your skin is donor skin while the rest of your breast has your original breast skin.

This is not always permanent as we can sometimes completely close the breast skin on top of the flap, but in some patients who could not have skin-sparing mastectomies, they may always have that section of tummy skin showing.

Things stay pretty swollen for up to 2-3 months so there may be hard or squishy areas that may change throughout your recovery. We try to create a semi-smooth transition from your breast/chest skin to your donor site flap, but our main priority at stage one is to get the blood vessels attached and keep them working.

Things may look a little deformed, asymmetrical, or strange after the first stage, but we fix these issues at stage 2. You are also likely going to have what we call “dog ears” on either side of your abdominal incision from pulling the skin together. This will also be fixed at stage 2.

6. I think you said I wouldn’t need to have mammograms anymore. Is that correct?

Usually, you will not need any mammograms after having a mastectomy with reconstruction. Your oncologist often makes the definitive decision if you are at any increased risk of recurrence or need any routine monitoring. We still highly recommend doing monthly self-breast exams to monitor for any changes. If it does, please notify us or your oncologist/breast surgeon if you find anything of concern.

7. I would like to see some before and after pictures of the different stages and final result. How can I accomplish this? Can you send some to me?

We have some pictures on our website that show you the before and after photos. We do not have any designated photos of the in-between stages to show you, unfortunately. Dr. Kline may have a few extra pictures to show you at your pre-op marking appointment if you wish.

Click here to view our image gallery. 

8. Will you be lifting my left breast to make it match the right one that doesn’t sag because of the radiation?

We always take radiated breasts into consideration when making the flaps. We sometimes make a radiated breast flap a little larger to account for this, or we lift the non-radiated breast more. Most of this tweaking is done at stage 2 or 3, and there is no hard-and-fast guarantee of how the radiated tissue will do. But, we try our best to give you a symmetrical result.

9. How is the fat grafting accomplished? With needles or what?

Fat grafting is done just like traditional liposuction, but instead of throwing away the fat, it gets strained of any debris, blood vessels, etc., and gets injected back into your body, just below the skin, wherever it is needed.

We only make a small incision through which we insert a cannula that gets shifted around under your skin to collect the fat cells. We make a few incisions in the donor sites that are discussed with you before your surgery and those incisions are closed with a few stitches and a little Dermabond glue on top. The strained fat is then inserted with a special bendable needle that can be shaped to follow around a breast mound or however we need it to go to inject the fat.

10. After the fat grafting, will that fat continue to replenish itself? Like if I gain weight, will my breasts get bigger?

After liposuction, fat accumulation tends to appear in areas other than sites that you have had the fat grafting from. This doesn’t mean you will never get fat in those areas again, but it often finds its way to a few different places. Your breasts will be your own tissue and fat, so if you did gain weight, you could possibly gain weight in your breasts and the same goes for losing weight. 

11. Will my C-section ledge be gone?

We try to take other abdominal scars into consideration when finding the best placement of your new “abdominoplasty” scar. By removing the tissue located on your abdomen, there is a good chance your C-section ledge will resolve, but we cannot guarantee this. It’s another one of those things that depends on the patient, and we will have a better answer for you when we do your pre-op marking.

12. When can I drive?

We don’t want you driving as long as you have drains in (breast or abdominal), which is typically 2-3 weeks. Also, if you are taking any prescription pain medication (Percocet, Dilaudid, Valium), we don’t want you driving until you have switched to taking over-the-counter medications.

We also want to ensure that you feel you can be a defensive driver and not worry that if you had to swerve out of the way, you’d hurt something. Most women sit in the back seat away from the airbag for about 2 weeks and often place a pillow between their chest and the seatbelt to help cushion the pressure from the belt itself.

13. When can I have sex?

We don’t recommend any strenuous activity for several weeks following surgery. I would plan to wait at least 2 weeks and then see what may be tolerated. You don’t want to be using your abdominal muscles for up to 6-8 weeks so you have to be mindful of your limitations. As things heal and you progress in your recovery, you may increase activity as tolerated.

14. Can you also remove the lump of scar tissue from the four drains that were put in my rib area by the other doctors? It makes my bra roll up, and it’s uncomfortable.

Depending on the exact location, we may be able to remove it at the first stage, but it is more likely that we will look into that at second stage as the process of harvesting and grafting the blood vessels is very time-consuming and is the main priority at that time.

15. When will I know if my nipples have to be removed?

This is really a question for your breast surgeon. If you are able to have a nipple sparing mastectomy, we cannot guarantee that your nipples will live as they can sometimes scab over and become necrotic. But, there is also a good chance they will survive. In the event that one or both of your nipples needed to be removed or did not survive, we have multiple options for nipple reconstruction.

16. Can I go ahead and get my flu shot before I have my surgery?

As I am answering this, I don’t believe it is currently flu season, and we would rather not introduce anything into your body this close to surgery. I would wait until 1-2 months after surgery.

Do you have a question about breast reconstruction or post-surgery that you’d like answered from our surgical team? Ask the doctor now 

Flap Reconstruction Surgery: Important Stats and Abstract Information

If you’ve had breast cancer and are considering reconstruction surgery, it’s possible that one of the options you may be looking into is flap reconstruction surgery.

Breast reconstruction utilizing “flap” techniques are procedures where body tissue is used to reconstruct the shape of your breast after surgery. While it’s a relatively common type of reconstructive surgery these days, we feel it’s important that you should learn as much as possible about the benefits and risks, and discuss them with your doctor before you have the procedure.

That’s why we at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction are always looking for better ways to educate and inform our patients before a decision.

One way we ensure our patients have access to the latest in medicine and medical technology is to have our surgeons and staff constantly learning, researching, and writing about their findings.

In fact, some of our latest research on reconstructive flap surgery was recently submitted to the American Association of Plastic Surgeons by our Dr. Kline. This specific abstract documented the success rate of our reconstructive flap surgeries with regard to the role of autogenous microvascular breast reconstruction in the community.

Check it out…

Abstract

PURPOSE: To present the continuing role of autogenous microvascular breast reconstruction in the community

METHODS: 1393 free perforator flaps for breast reconstruction were performed by two surgeons from October, 2003 to October, 2016. All flaps were performed in two community hospitals. Types of flaps included DIEP unilateral (122 flaps), DIEP simultaneous bilateral (866 flaps), DIEP bipedicle (106 flaps), sGAP unilateral (55 flaps), sGAP simultaneous bilateral (202 flaps), iGAP unilateral (2 flaps), iGAP simultaneous bilateral (18 flaps), PAP unilateral (5 flaps), PAP bilateral (10 flaps), SIEA unilateral (3 flaps), SIEA simultaneous bilateral (2 flaps), and TFL perforator (1 flap). The series includes a large number of both immediate and delayed reconstructions, prior failed reconstructions, and patients with a history of radiation.

RESULTS: Overall flap survival rate was 98.2%. DIEP survival rate was 99.1%. sGAP survival rate was 95.7%. No primary unilateral flaps were lost, and no bilateral losses occurred. Including those patients whose initial flaps failed, 99% of patients were ultimately successfully reconstructed with autogenous tissue.

CONCLUSION: Implant-based reconstruction is an appropriate initial choice for many patients, but autogenous microsurgical reconstruction still remains an excellent option, whether as an initial choice, or for patients with a prior history of failed reconstruction. With proper preparation and institutional support, perforator flap breast reconstruction can be performed with a high degree of success in a community hospital setting.

On top of the abstract, our physicians—Richard M. Kline Jr., M.D. and James E. Craigie MD—also wrote the chapter on GAP (buttock) flaps for the book Perforator Flaps for Breast Reconstruction.

Check out the book chapter here.

As we mentioned earlier, we are passionate about continuing to learn, receive training, and interact with the scientific community to ensure we provide our patients with the safest, most advanced care.

And, while we’re doing our job to make sure we’re properly training our staff and staying up-to-date with the latest in medical technology, there’s one thing we encourage you to do as well—always ask for medical procedure stats.

Much like the abstract we provided above, your doctor should be able to provide you with stats on the procedures he or she conducts.

When patients come to us and ask questions on success rates, we can happily tell them the different percentage rates of success for the various procedures we provide. Equipping our patients with this information empowers them to make wise, educated decisions about their own health.

So, please, before you move ahead with a specific procedure, ask your doctor for the stats. If they have a high success rate with their surgeries, then you’re in the right place. If they don’t, it’s time for you to find another doctor.

We wish you the best as you move forward with any new procedure you may need!

Did you find the book chapter insightful? Let us know what you learned and what you thought was helpful to know in the comments below!

Life after Mastectomy: Prosthetic Nipples

Being diagnosed with breast cancer and facing a cancer battle can be a long, draining, and scary experience.

While women who beat cancer find themselves overjoyed and grateful, there’s still a part of having breast cancer that tends to linger—especially if they’ve had to go through a mastectomy.

While we know women feel incredibly grateful that they’ve won their battle with cancer and feel they can begin life again, it’s also very common for them to long to feel like their old selves again.

At The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction, we want all women to feel confident, radiant, and beautiful after a mastectomy, which is why we were so excited to find out about a new non-surgical solution to breast reconstruction—prosthetic nipples.

We love the product so much, we even carry demos in our office for women to try.

So, how exactly did this product come to be and how does it work?

I’m going to let breast cancer survivor and inventor Randi Johnson tell you in her own words.

Here’s her story…

After the shock of my IDC breast cancer diagnosis in 2007, I was hoping for the least invasive corrective surgery. The lump was too large for a lumpectomy, so a unilateral mastectomy was the choice I made. I had a new full-time job and didn’t want to take 6 weeks off for breast reconstruction.

The mastectomy was not very painful and I had a good recovery, but reality hit as bandages came off and I saw “my new normal” in the mirror. I’m not an especially vain person, but it was hard to feel “pretty” for my husband, even though I knew he loved me beyond the disfigurement.

I found myself wearing my prosthetic mastectomy bra to bed at night.

We happened to hear about Dr. Khouri in Miami, FL  who was doing a less invasive type of breast reconstruction surgery. There were no incisions, it was outpatient, and had a lower risk of complications. I only had to miss 3 days of work for each step (4 fat grafting sessions, for me).

Adding to the appeal, was the fact that they would take fat from tummy, thighs and anywhere else I didn’t want it and make a new breast out of it.

What’s not to love about that!

I was amazed to find that Dr. Khouri was in network for my insurance plan. There were still travel expenses etc., but somehow it all worked out.

It felt like I was growing a new breast and hardly had time to think about not having a nipple on that side, but when Dr. Khouri made an impression of my natural nipple and made up a silicone “rough draft” of a nipple for my recon side (for purpose of photos), my husband asked if he could tinker with the idea.

Dr. Khouri was very impressed with the prototype we brought back to show him a few months later. He invited us to display our Naturally Impressive nipple prosthetics as a vendor at a couple of his fat grafting conferences.

We received a great reception as well as some helpful ideas from the international breast surgeon attending.

I was part of an “MD Rounds” event at one of those Fat Graft Conferences and it was exciting to have MDs ask in disbelief (right after they heard my history). “Did you have a mastectomy?” We have heard countless similar stories from our clients about their Naturally Impressive nipples “fooling” others because they look so natural.

Now it’s become my new body image. If I have it off for a day or two, the asymmetrical image in the mirror doesn’t feel like it’s me.

We’ve been serving women through Naturally Impressive, LLC, since January 2010. As a “Mom and Pop” shop, we keep operating costs low and we also get to know many of our clients quite well. It’s an incredible joy! We love it!

No matter what option women choose regarding nipples, Naturally Impressive can be a way to “feel normal” again. For some, this is a great short-term option while waiting for tissue to settle before making a permanent choice. For others, it’s a wonderful non-surgical long-term solution.

If you or someone you care about is longing to feel normal again in the nipple department, check out our website to see the realism, variety and affordability of choices we offer.

Click here to visit the Naturally Impressive website.

You can also call Naturally Impressive, LLC, at 715-829-4488 if you have any questions.

Do you have a favorite post-mastectomy product that makes you feel confident and beautiful?

Share it with us in the comments below!

Give Yourself the Gift of Health This New Year


With the holidays behind us, it’s time to get excited and look forward to the new year ahead of us. Before we officially close out the season of giving, there is one more gift we want to talk about.

And that gift is the gift of health.

We believe that taking care of your body and being aware of your health are the keys to living a happy and healthy life. There’s no better time than right now to put yourself on the path to health and happiness as we begin a new year.

It doesn’t matter how good or poor your health currently is. There are many small lifestyle changes you can make to help ensure you’re giving your body the things it needs while also getting the medical care you need to stay happy and healthy.

The new year means starting fresh. We hope you’ll take advantage of this time to put in place a plan for the year that promotes your health and happiness.

Not sure where to start? No worries, we have a few suggestions!

Keep reading to discover a few things you can do to give yourself the gift of health this year.

Eat Healthy

Your health begins with what you put in your body.

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with indulging in a tasty treat every once in a while. But it’s also important to ensure that you are getting the nutrients from fresh meats (if you’re not a vegetarian), vegetables, and fruits.

Here are a few of our favorite recipes you can add to your weekly meal plan.

Go for Regular Physicals

Visiting your doctor for a yearly exam is a great way to make sure you’re in tip-top shape.
Most important, your doctor might be able to detect health problems before you notice them. And that’s important because early detection is the key to saving lives, especially for cancer patients.

You can’t go wrong with a yearly exam to make sure you’re in good health.

Get Exercise

Exercise is an important part of staying healthy. It helps you build muscles, burn excess fat, and keep your heart strong.

If you’re someone who feels as if you can’t exercise, don’t worry. It’s ok to start slow. Something as simple as a walk around the block is a great place to get started.

Check out some of our favorite ways to get into an exercise routine.

Perform At-Home Breast Exams

Ladies, this one is super important!

As we mentioned before, early detection saves lives. Which is why at-home breast exams are so important, even if you don’t have a family history of breast cancer.

BreastCancer.org gives a great overview on how to do an at-home breast exam. Check it out here.

Your doctor can also teach you how to do a self-exam. Ask your doctor to show you at your next appointment.

Take Note of Changes in Your Body

Nobody knows your body better than you do.

If you notice any changes—including lumps, spots, marks, bumps, rashes, or even less visible changes like unusual headaches or pains—be sure to report those changes to your doctor.

Your doctor can diagnose any health concerns and put you on the path to health and happiness.

What do you do to live a healthy life? Share with us below!

Spread Joy to Cancer Patients with Cheerful Holiday Cards

There is so much to be cheerful about during the holiday season. It’s a time where many people travel to visit loved ones, indulge in delicious food, and revel in the joy of the holiday season.

How lucky are we to be able to enjoy this time of year!

Unfortunately, there are also many people that will struggle this season due to illness or disease, like breast cancer. Many of these people will have no choice but to celebrate the holidays from the hospital.

That definitely puts a damper on all of the holiday joy and festivities.

We truly wish there was a way to bring everyone home to spend time with their loved ones during this time of year.

Sadly, there is no way we can make that possible, but we can do the next best thing…

Bring some of the holiday spirit to those who are the hospital.

Every year, thousands of people create holiday cards to share with adults and children who can’t go home for the holidays.

It may seem like a small gesture, but there is no doubt these cards bring a lot of happiness to those who receive them.

The best part is that it only takes a little bit of your time to brighten someone’s day.

So, this year, if you feel the desire to spread some cheer, we encourage you to make a few holiday cards to give to people who are in the hospital.

How to Get Involved with Sending Holiday Cards

Many hospitals conduct holiday drives during December to collect cards for their patients.

We suggest you give your local hospital a call to see if they are collecting cards. If they aren’t, they may know of other medical care facilities that are, and can get you hooked up.

Another great resource to contact would be your local community groups, like Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, or local charities.

These groups may already be involved with creating cards and can help you get connected.

American Cancer Society Greeting Cards

If you’re not very crafty but still want to give back, we suggest checking out the American Cancer Society greeting cards fundraiser.

Every year, the American Cancer Society sells holiday cards and the proceeds benefit cancer research.

You can purchase a variety of different cards to hand out to your family and friends this year. Or better yet, order some to hand out at your local hospital!

To check out the American Cancer Society cards and find more information, please visit their website.

American Cancer Society Greeting Cards Website

Have you ever handed out hospital holiday cards? Let us know where below!

 

The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction Gives Thanks

In a few short days, we will be celebrating Thanksgiving—a time of year in which many of us stop and reflect on everything we have to be grateful for.

This year we made sure to stop and think about the many things we are grateful for at The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction.

We’d love to share with you a few of the things we are thankful for. Check it out!

We are thankful for…

  • The opportunity to work with so many strong and courageous women who have battled breast cancer. You are an inspiration.
  • Our team of highly skilled staff and medical professionals that provide such amazing care to all of our patients.
  • The incredible breast cancer fundraising events, like the Susan G. Komen Race for a Cure, that raise money for new cancer research and treatment options.
  • The friends and family that stand by our side no matter what challenges we are facing.
  • All of the technology and medical advances that help keep women healthy and thriving.
  • Our pets, for those of us that have them, that are always available for a stress-relieving and calming cuddle on the couch.
  • The fall weather and the beauty that comes with this season.
  • All of the amazing success stories that we get to hear from our patients. It is a joy to celebrate you and your health!

We could go on for days about the many things we are grateful for all year round!

The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction wishes you a happy and wonderful Thanksgiving celebration. And we hope you’ll take some time this week to think about everything you are thankful for.

We’d love to hear what you’re thankful for this Thanksgiving!

Comment below!